Writing update: exciting news!

Retreat west logoAmanda Saint founder of Retreat West Books writes:

Ali Thurm signed for debut novel

Thrilled to have signed the debut novel from Ali Thurm for Retreat West Books. One Scheme of Happiness is a story of desire, obsession and delusion and just how far you will go to get what you think you want. It was shortlisted for the 2018 Cinnamon Debut Novel Award and the narrator Helen is telling the story of her complicated and deceitful friendship with married couple, Sam and Vicky.
Friends when they were children, they are all now in their forties and haven’t seen each other since school. Helen has remained in their home town to look after her sick mother and when Sam and Vicky return to try and repair their shaky marriage she gets embroiled in their games, but she’s also playing some of her own and things spiral out of control. Ali’s writing is beautiful and atmospheric, and I am very much looking forward to bringing this story to the world.

Ali Thurm is a novelist, poet and teacher living in London. Her poems have been published in magazines and anthologies, and in 2016 she was shortlisted for the Bridport Prize. Her first poetry collection was shortlisted for the Cinnamon Press debut poetry collection in 2015. In 2017 she was longlisted for the Bath Novel Award and shortlisted for the First Novel Award (Daniel Goldsmiths). She also won a prize in the 2017 Troubadour International Poetry Competition. Ali completed City University’s Novel Studio course in 2013, where she worked on the draft of One Scheme of Happiness. She is represented by Emily Sweet at Emily Sweet Associates.
Ali said:

‘I’m thrilled that Retreat West Books has taken on One Scheme of Happiness. I’ve been working on the novel for several years with the support of a group of friends from my City University writing group and with advice from my agent, Emily Sweet. I’m looking forward to working with Amanda and to benefitting from her expert editorial skills to make the story really shine.
My first-person narrative explores what can happen to a character when the lid is
taken off her deeply-repressed emotions and how, without support, mental-health issues can lead to destructive and disastrous choices.

One Scheme of Happiness will publish in February 2020.

 

The Dreamers: a review

THE DREAMERS

A small Californian town is under threat when a mysterious virus starts spreading from the local college; people fall asleep and can’t be woken. Karen Thompson Walker handles the material very efficiently, building up an atmosphere of disbelief that escalates gradually until the town is cut off from the outside world by a ‘cordon sanitaire’. No one is allowed in; no one can leave. The disease affects everyone, from the smallest new-born baby to the elderly and confused living in a nursing home. There are echoes of Camus’ The Plague and of Rip Van Winkle, laced with theories about sleep and dreaming from ancient Greece via Freud to the latest findings of neuroscientists. All against a quietly smouldering background of global warming: the lake is drying up, trees are slowly dying and the whole area is at the risk of devastating forest fires.

The sense that this illness affects all is echoed by the way the story is told from several viewpoints with no one central character: a young fresher who doesn’t fit in; two young sisters with an eccentric father; a professor grieving for his partner and a young couple patching together their marriage with a new baby amongst others.

The Dreamers is a subtle story where reality and dreaming become mixed, and the decisions we take in how to live our lives are put under the microscope. A quietly devastating page-turner.

Published Feb 2019

The Little Snake: a review

the little snakeVery different from her usual style of writing, A L Kennedy has written a feminist novella for adults based on St Exupery’s well-loved children’s picture book, The Little Prince.

The Little Snake is a fable that gently reminds us that life is more than building great cities and fighting over resources; life can be lived in a small, simple way accepting loss and embracing love. If you take tiny steps across a small garden it makes it appear so much bigger. This is a beautifully-told story, sometimes tongue-in-cheek, that quickly gets its point across and, if you’re familiar with this type of fable it won’t really work for you. I would pitch it more for a YA audience, or for very stressed out adults.

But it’s still a timely nudge to all of us to slow down and to remember that simple activities like flying a kite, being kind to our friends and sharing food is all we need to be happy in life.

All Among The Barley: a review

all-among-the-barley

When it comes to evoking the natural world and capturing the sense of a superstitious, rural community on the verge of disappearing after the First World War, Melissa Harrison is a very fine writer. For the first half of All Among The Barley it was like watching paint slowly drying, albeit a very beautiful paint from Farrow and Ball; and that’s not to say it’s a bad thing, just that there is often little sense of plot and (apart from the main protagonist) some of the characters have been picked straight from central casting. There are shades of Hardy here, even down to burning ricks and a rape scene reminiscent of poor Tessa Durbeyfield, as well as a very Hardyesque sense of dark brooding and foreboding. And yet… half way through everything gains pace and the hints of forces at work are substantiated and brought out into the open: one character really is the violent drunk we’d suspected and another an out-and-out fascist. Topical questions are raised about how communities deal with those who are different (migrant workers) and how easy it is to be influenced by the politically astute (Farage and Johnson).

Ultimately, this is an enjoyable story of the loss of innocence in a vanishing world brought to life by a writer with painterly gifts.

Ghost Wall: a review

 

Ghost Wall by Sarah MossSarah Moss is a novelist, travel writer and academic, teaching in the University of Warwick’s Writing Programme. She’s written five novels, The Tidal Zone (Granta, 2016), Signs for Lost Children (Granta, 2015), Bodies of Light (Granta, 2014), Night Waking (Granta, 2011) and Cold Earth (Granta, 2009).

Ghost Wall, published September 2018, is a brilliantly realised and utterly mesmerising novella. When a group of people come together to re-enact Iron Age life there’s a slow spiralling down into the threat of real violence.

At the beginning of the story the (historic) ritual killing of a young girl is graphic and utterly terrifying, setting the scene for an underlying sense of dread that permeates the book. There’s also humour through the contrast of the ‘soft southerners’ from the local university reluctantly dressing up in hand-woven tunics and trying to live as hunter-gatherers (but supplementing their starvation diet with sweets and Coke); while the young northern girl (through whose eyes we see the story) lives with a father obsessed by the Iron Age: she and her mother have to take the holiday completely seriously. Dialogue is sharp and witty and the descriptions excellent. This really is a book that’s hard to put down. A gripping novella.

Five Star rating *****

The Last Children of Tokyo: a review

the last children of Tokyo

Yoko Tawada’s latest book is a novella set in a dystopian Japan where climate change and disease have forced the country to close its borders – no one is allowed in or out. Even foreign words are banned.

Yoshiro is bringing up his great-grandson, Mumei in a world where the old still work and only get older, and children get sick and die young. The rest of the family have left Tokyo or died.

“The aged could not die; along with the gift of everlasting life, they were burdened with the terrible task of watching their great-grandchildren die.”

Getting Mumei to eat or get dressed is a constant battle; like all children his teeth are soft, he is underweight and at risk of an infection. If he expends too much energy getting dressed, he won’t be able to walk to school.

The future is bleak. And yet the writing is effortlessly light and often darkly humorous: People aren’t called “middle-aged elderly” until they’re well into their nineties. Children without parents aren’t orphans but “independent children”.

A surreal story about human love in the face of an unimaginable future, this is a thought-provoking short novel; it’s images of damaged children living in a ruined world will stay with you. A cautionary tale for our troubled times.

This English translation by Margaret Mitsutani is published by Portobello Books.

Separated from the Sea: a review

Separated from the SeaIn the UK, the short story had its heyday in the first half of the twentieth century, but more recently there’s been a tendency to treat it with caution – an almost anxious feeling each time you start a new story that there’ll be characters you’ve never met, in unfamiliar scenarios. Like being invited to a party where you don’t know anyone. You don’t have the comparative safety of the novel where the author leads you gently by the hand from one chapter to the next, developing the narrative. But, in this age of soundbites and instant gratification, I’m happy to say the short form is quietly being resurrected as a flexible, relevant vehicle for narrative. As in this collection of accessible short stories from new indy publisher Retreat West.

 
Amanda Huggins is an experienced and widely-published fiction writer and has won awards for her travel writing but Separated from the Sea is her first full collection of short stories. Her skill at world-building makes getting to grips with new characters and new settings very easy for the reader – she makes you equally at home in the urban sprawl of Tokyo, in a lonely seaside town in Yorkshire or in a bar in New York. With just a few killer sentences she hooks you into a new world. There are some flawless little stories here – imaginative and concise, which are the basic requirements of a successful short story. Just a couple are less well thought out than others and would have benefitted from more redrafting, but in a collection like this I didn’t mind; like eating a packet of Revels (I may be in a minority here) the pleasure is always heightened by knowing a few of them will be the ones you don’t like (chocolate peanuts in my case).

 
Themes include: decisions made then abandoned, women leaving men and branching out on their own, failing relationships, loneliness, dealing with grief at losing a father, and other losses. The sea as in the title story features in several of these richly-imagined stories. The writing is taut and no word is wasted. In Already Formed a woman dealing with the end of an affair finds out the baby she’s hoped for is ‘not even a line on a pregnancy test.’ The Last of Michiko shows a widower gradually coming to terms with his loss: when a friend gives him a jar of what she claims is his wife’s homemade bean jam ‘He knew it was not Michiko’s; he knew it was a deception. But he understood it was meant as a kind one.’ And in Edgware there are beautiful images from the narrator’s travels: ‘silk scarves billowing like jewel-bright parachutes.’

 
These entertaining short stories are perfect for a summer holiday, a short commute or for your bedside reading.